Watch this video to restore your enthusiasm for restoring your world

Emilys 6 Happy ShovelsTo restore the world we need to re-charge our batteries. We can’t save our climate, soils or biodiversity on a flat battery of despondency. Our governments aren’t going to restore the environment or our confidence – but our communities can.

I avoid posting blogs that simply say, ‘Ooh look, here’s something cool from the internet’ – but you do have to watch this. You’ll love it.

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Burning (for) biodiversity: what is a patch burn mosaic?

Great_Sandy_Desert Framed

Like patch mosaic burning? I bet you know someone who does. The concept – like corridors and connectivity – is popular with land managers and the public, and often adopted with ‘mucho gusto’.

The theory that underpins patch mosaic burning is simple. Continue reading

A great GPS for your mobile phone

MorgansMap1945Our old Melways street directory has gathered dust for years. We use Google Maps on the phone now. A man who sounds like George Bush barks out, ‘In 20 meters, at the roundabout, take the third exit. Take the third exit’. Despite his name, George is absolutely useless in the bush. Google Maps doesn’t show most dirt tracks and phone reception is often poor away from towns and highways.

Last weekend, we used a fantastic new GPS app during a day walk in a nearby national park. It’s a free app for Android phones and iPhones called Continue reading

Calling all early career ecologists, want to be featured in a blog?

BlogOver the past few years, I’ve enjoyed writing blogs about exciting research by many ecologists and conservation biologists. It’s a wonderful opportunity to spread the word to a large and enthusiastic audience.

I’m keen to promote more work by early career researchers in the future. Recent blogs on fire in the mallee and estimating the cover of plants, for example, were based on fantastic papers by PhD students. Both posts were very popular with readers.

So this is a call to all the early career researchers who read this blog. If you’d like your work featured, please send me an email.

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100 years of habitat change: an animated fire ecology

The Southern Legless Lizard, Delma australis. Original photo courtesy of the Mallee fire & biodiversity team.

The Southern Legless Lizard, Delma australis. Original photo from the Mallee Fire & Biodiversity Team.

Southern Legless Lizards are stylish critters. Big round eyes, happy smile; who couldn’t love ‘em. What they lack in limbs, Delma make up for in energy, excitability, and a dash of fussiness. Southern legless lizards don’t live just anywhere. They like their mallee habitat to be just right.

Fire shapes the spinifex mallee of south-eastern Australia. Fire, and the time between fires; the period when plants grow, die, drop limbs and decompose. As the mallee grows older, legless lizards – like many animals – become more, or less, common. Some species thrive shortly after a burn, others prosper in old, unburnt stands. Continue reading

Ageing the mallee: a history in burnt trees

mallee-spinifex 3

Coppicing Mallee trees and Spinifex grass in Mungo National Park. Original photo: Visit Mungo.

Trees grow short in the mallee. Little rain and poor soils stunt their growth. Over thousands of square kilometers, in semi-arid Victoria, South Australia and New South Wales, many mallee eucalypts reach just 6 to 7 meters high. The short trees burn well, especially when growing above Spinifex Continue reading